Scorpio has confirmed it is fitting 146 scrubbers across vessels in its dry bulk and tanker fleets to comply with the 1 January 2020 IMO global sulphur cap.

Orient Overseas Container Line (OOCL) has confirmed plans for a 2020 low sulphur cap bunker surcharge.

The popularity of scrubbers as a way to comply with the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap has grown rapidly over the last six months with over 1,000 systems ordered in that period, according to classification society DNV GL.

Norwegian scrubber manufacturer Yara Marine Technologies is looking to nearly double its workforce to meet demand.

Hapag-Lloyd is the latest major container line to announce a fuel charge to cover the costs of using compliant low sulphur fuel for the 2020 sulphur cap.

Hapag-Lloyd is to convert one of the LNG-ready containerships it acquired in the UASC merger, and fit scrubbers on two vessels as it analyses options apart from low sulphur fuel for complying with the IMO's 2020 sulphur cap.

Last week was a busy one in the world of maritime and shipping with the impact of regulations on business and operations continuing to dominate the agenda.

The IMO 2020 clock is ticking - as 1 January 2020 looms closer, now little more than one year away, interest in scrubbers seems to have surged. Most notably, a number of public companies have joined the scrubber fray, leading financial analysts, rather than purely technical types, to look closely at their economics.

With all the focus on complying with the 2020 sulphur cap the IMO’s Ballast Water Management Convention (BWM Convention) has slipped off the agenda with the need to comply seemingly an accepted fact whatever the individual’s view on how the regulation has been executed.

Thirty-four ceos and industry leaders have signed up to a call for action on the decarbonisation of shipping.

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