New Zealand’s Ports of Auckland is aiming for zero emissions by 2040 and is looking to hydrogen power as an alternative to batteries to power terminal equipment.

Norway’s scrubber manufacturer Yara Marine Technologies has made its footprint in China with the opening of its new Shanghai office, responding to increasing demand for scrubbers in newbuilds and retrofit projects in the Asia-Pacific region.

As China enforces its 0.5% sulphur emission control areas (ECAs) from 1 January 2019 it is also mandating that new domestic vessels be equipped for shoreside power, or cold ironing.

Germany’s TT-Line has confirmed newbuilding deals with China’s Jinling Shipyard to build up to two LNG dual fuel ropax vessels for use in the Baltic Sea.

With just about a year left before the enforcement of the IMO 2020 global fuel sulphur cap, the shipping community is now seeing a global phenomenon of LNG bunkering services and infrastructure taking shape.

Mediterranean Shipping Company (MSC) has paid $630,625 in penalties to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) for violating the Ocean-Going Vessel At-Berth regulation.

Maersk has set out a vision to achieve zero carbon dioxide emission by 2050, with an intermediate goal of having carbon neutral vessels commercially viable by 2030.

Last week’s announcement by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) that it would ban open-loop scrubbers from its port waters from 1 January 2020 when IMO’s 0.5% global sulphur cap comes into force has set the cat among the pigeons for a growing number of owners opting to for exhaust gas cleaning for compliance with the regulation.

Spain’s energy firm Repsol announced that it has completed its largest LNG bunkering operation using 11 LNG trucks at the port of Cartagena.

Singapore’s ST Engineering has announced a suite of greener engineering solutions for the maritime industry to help them cope with stricter IMO regulations and embark on the overall direction towards innovative operations.

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