After all the hype and public protests those familiar with the workings of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will not be surprised to learn there were no major announcements coming out of last week’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) meeting, and apparent new favourite – going slower – hit a speed hump.

With the sulphur cap less than eight months away the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) is pushing to get guidelines for non-availability of fuel adopted at the IMO MEPC meeting this week.

Michael Grey worries that the protests around the IMO’s MEPC 74 meeting could deflect from necessary action for the longer term to tackle environmental issues.

As the industry focuses its attention on the IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) meeting and regulations for emissions, another global regulation designed to both protect the environment and the safety of workers – the Hong Kong Convention on ship recycling – is yet to come into force a decade after its adoption.

Ahead of the critical IMO Marine Environment and Protection Committee 74 (MEPC 74) meeting in London next week, the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS) urges IMO members and all stakeholders to "face up to their responsibilities” and reach “workable and sustainable solutions”.

Over 100 shipowners, with a strong Greek representation, have publicly backed mandatory speed limits for shipping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in an open letter to member states of IMO.

“We’ve agreed to do it, but we don’t have the recipe on the mechanics, the measures or the technologies,” declared Sveinung Oftedal, chairman of the IMO’s Subcommittee on Pollution Prevention and Response, as he addressed delegates attending the 10th Chemical & Product Tanker Conference in London earlier this week. 

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) looks set to agree Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emission cuts of at least 50% by 2050 as a week of difficult negotiations at the Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) draw to a close.

Alisdair Pettigrew, managing director of BLUE Communications, and a consultant to several organisations in the marine environment space, writes in response to the article Transparency audit and the IMO’, published 9 April and by Seatrade Maritime columnist Michael Grey.

The home to the world's second largest ship registry, the low lying Marshall Islands says it is willing to work with other nations on the text of the Initial Strategy presented to the International Maritime Organization (IMO), but warns it will disassociate itself with any outcome that falls short a level with the possibility of achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement.

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