Stena Bulk has become the latest owner to opt for scrubbers for 2020 sulphur cap compliance with an order for up to 21 units from Shanghai Bluesoul Environmental Technology.

Scorpio has confirmed it is fitting 146 scrubbers across vessels in its dry bulk and tanker fleets to comply with the 1 January 2020 IMO global sulphur cap.

Last week in shipping scrubbers, and whether they are a good investment continued to be a dominate topic, while kidnapping of seafarers in the southern Philippines remained a real threat.

The availability of capital, both equity and debt, is a perennial discussion and has two particular areas of focus at present - for consolidation and green loans for retrofits to meet environmental regulations.

The popularity of scrubbers as a way to comply with the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap has grown rapidly over the last six months with over 1,000 systems ordered in that period, according to classification society DNV GL.

New York-listed dry bulk shipowner Star Bulk Carriers has secured $70m in green loan financing for its scrubber retrofits as part of a $310m loan agreement.

Norwegian scrubber manufacturer Yara Marine Technologies is looking to nearly double its workforce to meet demand.

Hapag-Lloyd is to convert one of the LNG-ready containerships it acquired in the UASC merger, and fit scrubbers on two vessels as it analyses options apart from low sulphur fuel for complying with the IMO's 2020 sulphur cap.

Last week was a busy one in the world of maritime and shipping with the impact of regulations on business and operations continuing to dominate the agenda.

The IMO 2020 clock is ticking - as 1 January 2020 looms closer, now little more than one year away, interest in scrubbers seems to have surged. Most notably, a number of public companies have joined the scrubber fray, leading financial analysts, rather than purely technical types, to look closely at their economics.

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