Norway’s scrubber manufacturer Yara Marine Technologies has made its footprint in China with the opening of its new Shanghai office, responding to increasing demand for scrubbers in newbuilds and retrofit projects in the Asia-Pacific region.

India’s The Great Eastern Shipping (GE Shipping) has earmarked up to $50m over the next four years to upgrade its fleet for compliance with IMO’s regulations on low-sulphur fuels and ballast water treatment systems (BWTS).

Last week’s announcement by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) that it would ban open-loop scrubbers from its port waters from 1 January 2020 when IMO’s 0.5% global sulphur cap comes into force has set the cat among the pigeons for a growing number of owners opting to for exhaust gas cleaning for compliance with the regulation.

Scorpio Group has provided details of $122m of scrubber installations for its tanker and bulker fleets.

VLCC owner DHT Holdings say its scrubber fitted vessels will be configured in such a way where it can burn 0.5% or less sulphur fuel where exhaust gas cleaning units are banned.

The world’s busiest port Singapore is to ban the use of open-loop scrubbers in its waters and ships will have to use compliant fuel once the IMO 2020 sulphur cap comes into force.

Singapore’s ST Engineering has announced a suite of greener engineering solutions for the maritime industry to help them cope with stricter IMO regulations and embark on the overall direction towards innovative operations.

Eagle Bulk has exercised options on 15 scrubbers bringing its firm ordered tally of exhaust gas cleaning units to 34.

The use of scrubbers to meet the 2020 sulphur cap, their lack of regulatory framework, and impact on the market were very much under discussion at the Greener Shipping Summit in Athens last week.

Feeder vessel owner MPC Container Ships has lined up a major potential scrubber orders for the majority of its fleet.

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