Intercontinental Exchange, Inc. (ICE) is planning to launch a new marine fuel 0.5% futures contracts early next year in advance of IMO’s global 0.5% sulphur cap regulation from 2020.

The world’s largest LNG bunkering vessel owned by Babcock Schulte Energy has started operations in Northwest Europe under charter to the Blue LNG joint venture.

With just about a year left before the enforcement of the IMO 2020 global fuel sulphur cap, the shipping community is now seeing a global phenomenon of LNG bunkering services and infrastructure taking shape.

UAE’s Adnoc Logistics & Services and Japan’s Inpex Corporation have penned a memorandum of understanding to explore LNG bunkering in the UAE and potentially expanding to Southeast Asia.

Last week’s announcement by the Maritime & Port Authority of Singapore (MPA) that it would ban open-loop scrubbers from its port waters from 1 January 2020 when IMO’s 0.5% global sulphur cap comes into force has set the cat among the pigeons for a growing number of owners opting to for exhaust gas cleaning for compliance with the regulation.

Scorpio Group has provided details of $122m of scrubber installations for its tanker and bulker fleets.

VLCC owner DHT Holdings say its scrubber fitted vessels will be configured in such a way where it can burn 0.5% or less sulphur fuel where exhaust gas cleaning units are banned.

The world’s busiest port Singapore is to ban the use of open-loop scrubbers in its waters and ships will have to use compliant fuel once the IMO 2020 sulphur cap comes into force.

Demand for scrubbers helped boost Wärtsilä’s marine business order intake in the third quarter.

Investigation findings into a dramatic accident involving an MSC containership in Jebel Ali last year topped reader interest last week, while the scrubber debate raged on with some of the largest orders yet seen were made, and Wärtsilä continued on its digital voyage with Singapore partnerships.

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