The decarbonisation of shipping and the IMO targets for CO2 reductions by 2030 and 2050 have thrown open the question as to what will be the future fuel, or fuels, of the industry. It is a complex question with no single silver bullet, and one which classification society American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is involved with on a global basis in trying to find a solution to.

As decarbonising shipping becomes mission critical for the industry classification society the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has launched a Global Sustainability Center in Singapore.

Six Dutch multi-nationals, including Shell and Heineken, have teamed-up with AP Moller – Maersk for the largest ever maritime biofuels pilot on a Triple-E containership between Rotterdam and Shanghai.

Panama Canal administrator Jorge Quijano announced on Monday that the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) had joined the IMO-supported Global Industry Alliance to Support Low Carbon Shipping (GIA).

“We’ve agreed to do it, but we don’t have the recipe on the mechanics, the measures or the technologies,” declared Sveinung Oftedal, chairman of the IMO’s Subcommittee on Pollution Prevention and Response, as he addressed delegates attending the 10th Chemical & Product Tanker Conference in London earlier this week. 

International Maritime Organization (IMO) secretary-general Kitack Lim has called on all sectors of the maritime industry to be involved in achieving the ambitious Greenhouse Gas (GHG) cuts set for the industry last year.

Whilst many people believe that the IMO’s ambition to reduce shipping’s 2050 carbon emissions by at least 50% compared with 2008 levels appears to be an almost impossible target, shipping economist Martin Stopford does not agree.

Bio-fuels produced by GoodFuels, which are claimed to be largely carbon neutral, have been trialled on Norden product tanker.

Car manufacturer Groupe Renault is partnering with Neoline for two pilot primarily wind-powered car carriers designed to deliver a 90% reduction in carbon emissions for a transatlantic route.

Mitsui OSK Line (MOL) has named its first LNG-powered tugboat built at Kanagawa Dockyard in Japan.

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