After all the hype and public protests those familiar with the workings of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) will not be surprised to learn there were no major announcements coming out of last week’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC) meeting, and apparent new favourite – going slower – hit a speed hump.

Michael Grey worries that the protests around the IMO’s MEPC 74 meeting could deflect from necessary action for the longer term to tackle environmental issues.

Ahead of the critical IMO Marine Environment and Protection Committee 74 (MEPC 74) meeting in London next week, the Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS) urges IMO members and all stakeholders to "face up to their responsibilities” and reach “workable and sustainable solutions”.

What do school students, a professional dance troupe and the Catholic Church have in common?

 

As shipping searches for future fuels to meet a low or zero carbon future a report commissioned by the Environmental Defense Fund Europe has identified ammonia as possible substitute for fossil fuel.

In this Sea Asia report – the final of a three-part series – we look at how global developments are impacting the maritime industry and what the industry needs to do to be able to move comfortably through these changes.

Over 100 shipowners, with a strong Greek representation, have publicly backed mandatory speed limits for shipping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in an open letter to member states of IMO.

The decarbonisation of shipping and the IMO targets for CO2 reductions by 2030 and 2050 have thrown open the question as to what will be the future fuel, or fuels, of the industry. It is a complex question with no single silver bullet, and one which classification society American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) is involved with on a global basis in trying to find a solution to.

Well-to-wake (WtW) reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by using LNG as a marine fuel can be reduced by up to 21% compared with current oil-based bunkers, according to an authoritative independent study commissioned jointly by SEA\LNG, an industry foundation promoting liquefied natural gas as a fuel for ships, and the Society for Gas as a Marine Fuel (SGMF).

As decarbonising shipping becomes mission critical for the industry classification society the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) has launched a Global Sustainability Center in Singapore.

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