When Hapag-Lloyd unveiled its ‘Strategy 2023’ towards the end of last year, it was based on the premise that the container shipping market’s rush of consolidation is over.

Twelve largest containerships at 23,000 teu ordered by Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) will be fitted with scrubbers, ahead of their expected deliveries in the second quarter of 2020.

“I’m crossing my fingers here,” DNV GL’s director, environment Eirik Nyhus admitted recently.

Nordic American Tankers (NAT) has underscored its belief that scrubbers are not the right solution for it to comply with IMO 2020, flagging up restrictions of use and possible bans on exhaust gas cleaning systems by some ports.

Stena Bulk has invested $55m to retrofit scrubbers to 16 oil tankers, with the installation work planned for completion before January 2020 to comply with the IMO fuel sulphur cap regulation.

A two-year scientific wash-water study conducted based on Carnival Corporation’s cruise ships have shown that the use of scrubbers are a safe and effective means of compliance with the IMO 2020 sulphur cap requirements.

Wallenius Wilhelmsen has become the latest shipowner to join the scrubber advocacy group Clean Shipping Alliance 2020 (CSA 2020), increasing the organisation’s membership to 35 shipowners operating a combined fleet of almost 2,500 vessels.

Dry bulk shipowner Genco Shipping & Trading (Genco) announced that it has secured additional financing for the acquisition and installation of scrubbers on 17 capesize vessels.

Another analyst has warned of impending financial doom for container lines if they fail to recoup the additional costs of meeting the IMO 2020 0.5% sulphur cap.

When a SOx scrubber is installed, it becomes vital to the vessel’s compliance and fuel economy. This makes choosing a scrubber more than a choice of technology. The supplier behind the scrubber must also be able to safeguard its performance – wherever the vessel sails and throughout the scrubber’s lifetime.

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