Greek containership owner Euroseas plans to burn low sulphur fuels to comply with the IMO 2020 0.5% sulphur cap.

Against a backdrop of a gloomy outlook for container trades Bimco analyst Peter Sand warns a failure by lines to pass increased fuel costs from the IMO 2020 sulphur cap could result in bankruptcies.

Lawyers from Reed Smith liken the raft of uncertainties facing shipowners and charterers in their charter contracts relating to compliance with the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap to that of the UK with Brexit.

The Union of Greek Shipowners (UGS) is maintaining its opposition to scrubbers as way to comply with the IMO’s 2020 sulphur cap despite significant investments in exhaust gas cleaning systems by some of its members.

Installation is not the only challenge when it comes to retrofitting a scrubber on an existing vessel, there is also financing where devil is in the details according to lawyers Watson Farley & Williams (WFW).

As the battle lines continue to be drawn over exhaust gas cleaning systems on ships Precious Shipping md Khalid Hashim warns that the discharge waste water from open-loop scrubbers “will comeback to haunt us”.

Marine fuel is too cheap for the environmental damage that it causes and sea transport does not reflect the true cost of bringing goods to market. These are the views of Euronav’s forthright ceo, Paddy Rodgers, who recently surprised the shipping community when he revealed his plans to step down later this year.

The debate currently raging over the use of open-loop scrubbers to meet the requirements of the IMO’s 2020 0.5% sulphur cap for marine fuel represents a massive own goal by the industry - from both a PR and global regulatory perspective.

One of shipping’s most outspoken executives Paddy Rodgers is standing down as ceo of tanker owner Euronav.

UK-based Cleanship Solutions announced that it has clinched a scrubber retrofit project for an unnamed vessel operator for over 30 containerships with capacity ranging from 7,500 teu to 15,000 teu.

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