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Live From Posidonia 2014
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Ship design to see ‘incremental changes’ over the next decade: ABS

ABS boss Christopher J Wiernicki sees “significant incremental changes” to ship design over the next decade, but “breakthrough” technology is unlikely before 2025.

“Between now and 2025 the big focus will be on the environmental regulations, on trying to improve the fuel consumption, reset speed versus fuel consumption requirements,” Wiernicki, chairman, president and ceo of ABS told the Tradewinds Shipowners Forum at Posidonia 2014.

As result he expects to incremental changes with a view to improving performance.

“In terms of ship design you will see probably for the next 10 years continued significant incremental changes in terms of hull form, engine technology, and so forth,” he said.

These developments could include the greater use of sensor technology and investments in nano technology to develop new coatings.

However, on more radical ideas such as the use of composites in construction he thought this was unlikely. “That brings with it a whole infrastructure issue in terms of maintenance and we are not set up for that.”

Similarly Wiernicki rejected the idea of the remote controlled ship. “Do I see a completely wireless ship with no crew? No, because if you have a spill how are you actually going to handle that? There are some very practical things.”

Any major breakthroughs are no expected for another 10 years or so.

“When you get to 2025 you may begin to see some additional possible breakthrough technologies but I don’t see that breakthrough technology in at least the next five to 10 years,” he said.

 

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