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Bharati Shipyard to develop LNG propelled ro-ro ship

Bharati Shipyard to develop LNG propelled ro-ro ship

Mumbai: India's Bharati Shipyard is to increase its offerings to the lucrative energy market with a newly developed liquefied natural gas (LNG)-powered ro-ro vessel.  "Today, we are in the design stage and will start constructing the vessels from mid 2009 and expect to deliver them by the second half of 2010," Sauvir Sarkar, president (design) of Bharati Shipyard is reported as saying in an interview with the Economic Times.

The 5800dwt ships will be built at its Dhabhol and Goa facilities and will feature single engine propulsion. Sarkar said the ship's design is being kept simple which also helps owners in mitigating risks involved in gas installations. Although the vessels will cost about 20% more to build as compared to traditional vessels, he claims that LNG propelled vessels will offer advantages such as substantial gains in terms of reduced maintenance, savings on fuel cost and low emissions and increase in comfort levels

"Now that India has the capability to develop LNG-fueled ships, LNG is easily available across the country and there is mandatory requirement to reduce emission levels in the country, it is time that we go for more of such vessels," he concluded. "Given the fact that most of world fleet and Indian fleet are made up of single engine-run ships, the advantage of going for LNG driven vessels with this concept are huge. For Bharati, as a leading shipbuilder for the offshore sector, the next step would be to design tugs & offshore vessels powered by LNG."  [26/01/09]

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