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Philippines to ban single hulled tankers from May

Philippines to ban single hulled tankers from May

Manila: The Philippines is said to be poised to enforce a ban on single hulled tankers calling at its ports. Beginning May 1, the country will join the likes of South Korea, which has set a 2010 deadline on single hulled vessels hoping to call at its ports. Additionally, it is rumored that China will also tighten port entry regulations on single hulled vessels in the next two years.

The moves to restrict the use of such vessels in and around Asian ports is in line with International Maritime Organization's (IMO) ongoing rules to phase-out all single hull tankers by 2010 - although the vessels may be operated up to 2015 provided they meet a certain set of conditions.

Although the US and European Union have earmarked 2010 for all vessels to comply with the double hull requirement, a number of major Asian maritime countries have allowed such ships to operate in their territorial waters until as far as 2015 - a key factor, as most single hull vessels are engaged in Asian trades.

However, environmental concerns have been exacerbated by the recent oil spill involving an single hulled tanker off the coast of South Korea late in 2007, have led the South Korean government to insist on double hulled tankers for more than 55% of annual imports of crude oil in 2008, and more than 60% in 2009. It is likely that the government will enforce the 2010 to reject port entries by all non compliant vessels.

The Philippine measure will be a step ahead of South Korea, banning port entry of every single hull tanker starting May.  [04/04/08]

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