Heerema’s Sleipnir sets world record 15,300 tonnes lift

The world’s largest crane vessel, Sleipnir, has set a world record for lifting a 15,300-tonne module during the installation of topsides at Noble Energy’s Leviathan field development in the Mediterranean last week.

The Sembcorp Marine-built, semi-submersible crane vessel (SSCV) entered into service in July 2018 and is part of Heerema Marine Contractor’s fleet.

Sleipnir, which has dual-fuel engines running on marine gas oil and LNG, has two revolving cranes capable of lifting up to 20,000 tonnes in tandem.

For the Leviathan development, the SSCV installed its two main in less than 20 hours. The vessel was selected for the job in order to save budget as the installation process takes less offshore time.

“Sleipnir is a unique vessel. It is LNG-powered and thus climate friendly. And our client enjoys the benefits. Because lifting larger modules means less time involved and therefore a smaller budget will suffice for a job,” said Koos-Jan van Brouwershaven, ceo of Heerema.

Sleipnir is deployed globally for installing and removing jackets, topsides, deepwater foundations, moorings and other offshore structures.

Read more: Heerema showcases world’s largest dual-fuel semi-submersible crane vessel

Posted 11 September 2019

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Seatrade ShipTech Middle East 2019

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Lee Hong Liang

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Asia Correspondent Lee Hong Liang has joined Seatrade as its Asia Correspondent. Based in Singapore, he will provide a significant boost to daily coverage of the Asian shipping markets, as well as bring with him an indepth, specialist knowledge of the bunkering markets. Throughout Hong Liang’s 14-year career as a maritime journalist, he has reported ‘live’ news from conferences, conducted one-on-one interviews with top officials, and the ability to write hard news and feature stories.

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