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Asian consortium adds five LNG newbuilds for QatarEnergy

Photo: John Foreman LNG carrier in Johor Strait near MMHE
LNG carrier in Johor Strait near MMHE
MISC, NYK, K-Line and China LNG Holdings have ordered a further five LNG carrier newbuildings for long-term charters to QatarEnergy.

MISC said the consortium of Asian shipowners had ordered five 174,000 cu m LNG carriers from Hudong Zhonghua Shipbuilding in China for the contracts with QatarEnergy.

Having previously secured seven long-term charter contracts with QatarEnergy in August this year, the new contracts brings the total number of newbuildings awarded to 12. The previous seven newbuilds were ordered from Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI).

The LNG carriers are expected to be delivered from 2025 onwards serving QatarEnergy on trading routes worldwide. The newbuilds will be fitted X-DF 2.1 engines with Intelligent Control by Exhaust Recycling (iCER) System.

MISC President & Group Chief Executive Officer, Captain Rajalingam Subramaniam said, "We would like to thank QatarEnergy for their continuing trust and confidence in our joint capabilities and expertise in delivering safe, efficient and reliable LNG shipping solutions.

“We look forward to add value to the partnership as we continue to play a progressive role in the global LNG shipping industry.”

MISC currently has a fleet of 30 LNG carriers, six Very Large Ethane Carriers (VLECs) and two LNG floating storage units.

QatarEnergy is taking up a major portion of the world’s LNG shipbuilding capacity as it undertakes an 100 vessel expansion through long-term charters with third party owners

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